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Seeing Everything and Nothing.wmv

Ubik Storyboard

1. Cigarette- broke apart on the ship back to earth
2. Wendy Wright quote- “Did it age us? … I feel old. I am old;…”
3. Phone book on the ship- 2 years older, made in 1990 instead of 1992
4. Coffee at moratorium that Joe buys- old, mouldy and scummy
5. Cigarette Al offers Joe- Joe rejects because he already knows they are stale before the packet is opened. 
6. 50c- Al lends Joe 50c and when Joe uses it, it becomes obsolete and over 40 years old.

Assessment 2
Document 10:
WRITING TO BE STEPPED ON
Take a piece of chalk
leave your thoughts on the path
watch them disappear.
2013 spring
Assessment 2
Document 9:
This is my process work leading up to the final design. I created my type design on tracing paper to begin with. I was then able to lay the paper on the concrete and line up my design onto the path. This allowed me to reference my original design whilst trying to replicate it by placing the tracing paper over the top. I have never done this process before and found it more difficult then I thought. You can see reflected in my work my inspiration as shown in my previous assessment 2 documents. 
Assessment 2
Document 8:
The text I chose is from the book Dreams That Come True, written by David Ryback. I used this book in assignment 1, choosing words and phrases that relate  to ephemera, erasure and transitory happenings. The phrase I chose to design was “even these ephemeral traces soon vanish”. I thought this related directly to my concept and work. You can see how I used this book in my first assignment in the above picture. 
Assessment 2
Document 7:
Ephemeral things are transitory, existing only briefly. Many artists conceptually explore ephemera in their works. The artists use non-traditional, non-durable materials which incorporate chance which results in the demise or disappearance of the work. Sometimes these works offer insights into the mourning process and deal with grief loss. 
In Poland there is a art competition; The Szpilman Award. The Szpilman Award is awarded to works that exist only for a moment or a short period of time.  The purpose of the award is to promote such works whose forms consist of ephemeral situations. The Szpilman Award is awarded annually. 
The above photographs are aerial views of natural ephemeral works by Jim Denevan. Jim Denevan is an American artist who creates temporary and ephemeral land art mostly in nature all over the world. He uses the natural surface as a canvas to create massive scale drawings in sand, ice and earth. Denevan doesn’t use any mediums creating his work, only a rake or large stick to create the lines on Earth’s surface. Most of the artworks represent complex geometrical drawings, which can be comprehended only from above. Similar to my work, Denevan leaves his works to be disintegrated and disappear due to human interaction and nature’s course.
Assessment 2
Document 7 continued:
A short video of Jim Denevan’s latest work in Siberia.
Assessment 2
Document 6:
The first three typography examples are inspiring works by Miquel Vila, Jackson Alves and Ryan Hamrick. All are international typographers. These three are inspiring in style, the cursive and tangent style is something I want to include in my type design. 
The next three photographs are chalk typography work by Dana Tanamachi. I will be using chalk as my medium for its ephemeral qualities and it’s easy application onto concrete. Tanamachi’s works are all intricate and clean while using chalk. I was worried about using chalk as a medium but after watching Dana Tanamachi’s time lapse videos and studying her work, I learnt I will need to measure and lay out my design before putting down final marks onto the concrete. 
Assessment 2
Document 5:

My typography and hand-lettering work has always been inspired by Sydney typographer Gemma O’Brien. 

O’Brien learnt letterpress in university, and created her blog for the love of type. At 21 she produced an experimental video, in which she inscribed her body with hand lettering, that caught the attention of Font Shop’s Jurgen Siebert and earned her an invitation to speak Germany’s 2009 Typo Berlin design conference. Gemma O’Brien has created work for clients including Woolworths, Vodafone, Smirnoff, Canon, and The New York Times. Gemma has also worked in art direction at Animal Logic, Fuel VFX and Toby & Pete. 

I like O’Brien’s cursive style which has always reflected upon my work, and has inspired my hand-lettering for this assignment. 

Assessment 2
Document 4:

Tim Silvers artwork, features busts frozen as they have been removed from their moulds. As the busts dry out and respond to atmospheric conditions they behave in a variety of ways; slumping onto their own forms, cracking up, crumbling, wrinkling and distorting. The sculptures are made from entropic materials, and usually begin dying the moment they are born. 
Tim Silver creates work just to be disintegrated, destroyed and decayed, a similar concept I am researching for my own chalk typography work. 
Assessment 2
Document 4:
Tim Silvers artwork, features busts frozen as they have been removed from their moulds. As the busts dry out and respond to atmospheric conditions they behave in a variety of ways; slumping onto their own forms, cracking up, crumbling, wrinkling and distorting. The sculptures are made from entropic materials, and usually begin dying the moment they are born. 
Tim Silver creates work just to be disintegrated, destroyed and decayed, a similar concept I am researching for my own chalk typography work. 
Assessment 2
Document 3:

"Instruction painting separates painting into two different functions: the instructions and the realisation. The work becomes a reality only when others realise the work. Instructions can be realised by different people in many different ways. This allows infinite transformation of the work that the artist himself cannot foresee, and brings the concept of "time" into painting. It immediately eliminates the usual emphasis put on the original painting, and art comes down from the pedestal.

Instruction painting makes it possible to explore the invisible, the world beyond the concept of time and space. And then, sometimes later, the instructions themselves will disappear and be properly forgotten.” - Yoko Ono

Yoko Ono, an artist of the Fluxus movement created many instructional paintings, some which are published in her book, Grapefruit. This allows an art work to be created many times by many people, differing each time. Creating a similar instruction for my typography work would drive my work conceptually, creating a stronger link with Happenings and the Fluxus movement.

Fluxus Movement and Happenings

Assessment 2
Document 2:
A happening is a performance, event or situation usually as performance art. Happenings take place anywhere, sometimes with the active participation of the audience. Key elements of happenings are planned, but artists sometimes improvise unforeseen upcomings. Happenings eliminate the boundary between the artwork and its viewer, the interactions between the audience and the artwork makes the audience, part of the art.Allan Kaprow first coined the term “happening” in1957. The form was imitated and the term was adopted by artists across the US, Germany and Japan. 

Happenings are difficult to describe, in part because each one is unique and completely different from one another. The term “Happening” has been used to describe many performances and events, organised by Allan Kaprow and others during the 1950s and 1960s. A “Happening” of the same performance will have a different outcomes because each performance depends on the action of the audience.

The Fluxus art movement encouraged a “do it yourself” aesthetic. Like Dada before it, Fluxus included a strong current of anti-commercialism, disparaging the conventional market-driven art world in favor of an artist-centered creative practice. In terms of an artistic approach, Fluxus artists preferred to work with whatever materials were at hand, and either created their own work or collaborated in the creation process with their colleagues.

Event Scores, such as George Brecht’s “Drip Music”, are essentially performance art scripts that are usually only a few lines long and consist of descriptions of actions to be performed rather than dialogue. Fluxus artists differentiate event scores from happenings. Whereas happenings were sometimes complicated, lengthy performances meant to blur the lines between performer and audience, performance and reality, Fluxus performances were usually brief and simple. 

Among its early associates were Joseph Beuys, Dick Higgins, Nam June Paik, Wolf Vostell, La Monte Young, Joseph Byrd, and Yoko Ono who explored media ranging from performance art to poetry to experimental music to film. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s (their most active period) they staged “action” events, engaged in politics and public speaking, and produced sculptural works featuring unconventional materials.

Ultimately I want my work to reflect a happening or a similar style to Fluxus artists and aesthetics. 

Seeing Everything and Nothing.wmv

Ubik Storyboard

1. Cigarette- broke apart on the ship back to earth
2. Wendy Wright quote- “Did it age us? … I feel old. I am old;…”
3. Phone book on the ship- 2 years older, made in 1990 instead of 1992
4. Coffee at moratorium that Joe buys- old, mouldy and scummy
5. Cigarette Al offers Joe- Joe rejects because he already knows they are stale before the packet is opened. 
6. 50c- Al lends Joe 50c and when Joe uses it, it becomes obsolete and over 40 years old.

Assessment 2
Document 10:
WRITING TO BE STEPPED ON
Take a piece of chalk
leave your thoughts on the path
watch them disappear.
2013 spring
Assessment 2
Document 9:
This is my process work leading up to the final design. I created my type design on tracing paper to begin with. I was then able to lay the paper on the concrete and line up my design onto the path. This allowed me to reference my original design whilst trying to replicate it by placing the tracing paper over the top. I have never done this process before and found it more difficult then I thought. You can see reflected in my work my inspiration as shown in my previous assessment 2 documents. 
Assessment 2
Document 8:
The text I chose is from the book Dreams That Come True, written by David Ryback. I used this book in assignment 1, choosing words and phrases that relate  to ephemera, erasure and transitory happenings. The phrase I chose to design was “even these ephemeral traces soon vanish”. I thought this related directly to my concept and work. You can see how I used this book in my first assignment in the above picture. 
Assessment 2
Document 7:
Ephemeral things are transitory, existing only briefly. Many artists conceptually explore ephemera in their works. The artists use non-traditional, non-durable materials which incorporate chance which results in the demise or disappearance of the work. Sometimes these works offer insights into the mourning process and deal with grief loss. 
In Poland there is a art competition; The Szpilman Award. The Szpilman Award is awarded to works that exist only for a moment or a short period of time.  The purpose of the award is to promote such works whose forms consist of ephemeral situations. The Szpilman Award is awarded annually. 
The above photographs are aerial views of natural ephemeral works by Jim Denevan. Jim Denevan is an American artist who creates temporary and ephemeral land art mostly in nature all over the world. He uses the natural surface as a canvas to create massive scale drawings in sand, ice and earth. Denevan doesn’t use any mediums creating his work, only a rake or large stick to create the lines on Earth’s surface. Most of the artworks represent complex geometrical drawings, which can be comprehended only from above. Similar to my work, Denevan leaves his works to be disintegrated and disappear due to human interaction and nature’s course.
Assessment 2
Document 7 continued:
A short video of Jim Denevan’s latest work in Siberia.
Assessment 2
Document 6:
The first three typography examples are inspiring works by Miquel Vila, Jackson Alves and Ryan Hamrick. All are international typographers. These three are inspiring in style, the cursive and tangent style is something I want to include in my type design. 
The next three photographs are chalk typography work by Dana Tanamachi. I will be using chalk as my medium for its ephemeral qualities and it’s easy application onto concrete. Tanamachi’s works are all intricate and clean while using chalk. I was worried about using chalk as a medium but after watching Dana Tanamachi’s time lapse videos and studying her work, I learnt I will need to measure and lay out my design before putting down final marks onto the concrete. 
Assessment 2
Document 5:

My typography and hand-lettering work has always been inspired by Sydney typographer Gemma O’Brien. 

O’Brien learnt letterpress in university, and created her blog for the love of type. At 21 she produced an experimental video, in which she inscribed her body with hand lettering, that caught the attention of Font Shop’s Jurgen Siebert and earned her an invitation to speak Germany’s 2009 Typo Berlin design conference. Gemma O’Brien has created work for clients including Woolworths, Vodafone, Smirnoff, Canon, and The New York Times. Gemma has also worked in art direction at Animal Logic, Fuel VFX and Toby & Pete. 

I like O’Brien’s cursive style which has always reflected upon my work, and has inspired my hand-lettering for this assignment. 

Assessment 2
Document 4:

Tim Silvers artwork, features busts frozen as they have been removed from their moulds. As the busts dry out and respond to atmospheric conditions they behave in a variety of ways; slumping onto their own forms, cracking up, crumbling, wrinkling and distorting. The sculptures are made from entropic materials, and usually begin dying the moment they are born. 
Tim Silver creates work just to be disintegrated, destroyed and decayed, a similar concept I am researching for my own chalk typography work. 
Assessment 2
Document 4:
Tim Silvers artwork, features busts frozen as they have been removed from their moulds. As the busts dry out and respond to atmospheric conditions they behave in a variety of ways; slumping onto their own forms, cracking up, crumbling, wrinkling and distorting. The sculptures are made from entropic materials, and usually begin dying the moment they are born. 
Tim Silver creates work just to be disintegrated, destroyed and decayed, a similar concept I am researching for my own chalk typography work. 
Assessment 2
Document 3:

"Instruction painting separates painting into two different functions: the instructions and the realisation. The work becomes a reality only when others realise the work. Instructions can be realised by different people in many different ways. This allows infinite transformation of the work that the artist himself cannot foresee, and brings the concept of "time" into painting. It immediately eliminates the usual emphasis put on the original painting, and art comes down from the pedestal.

Instruction painting makes it possible to explore the invisible, the world beyond the concept of time and space. And then, sometimes later, the instructions themselves will disappear and be properly forgotten.” - Yoko Ono

Yoko Ono, an artist of the Fluxus movement created many instructional paintings, some which are published in her book, Grapefruit. This allows an art work to be created many times by many people, differing each time. Creating a similar instruction for my typography work would drive my work conceptually, creating a stronger link with Happenings and the Fluxus movement.

Fluxus Movement and Happenings

Assessment 2
Document 2:
A happening is a performance, event or situation usually as performance art. Happenings take place anywhere, sometimes with the active participation of the audience. Key elements of happenings are planned, but artists sometimes improvise unforeseen upcomings. Happenings eliminate the boundary between the artwork and its viewer, the interactions between the audience and the artwork makes the audience, part of the art.Allan Kaprow first coined the term “happening” in1957. The form was imitated and the term was adopted by artists across the US, Germany and Japan. 

Happenings are difficult to describe, in part because each one is unique and completely different from one another. The term “Happening” has been used to describe many performances and events, organised by Allan Kaprow and others during the 1950s and 1960s. A “Happening” of the same performance will have a different outcomes because each performance depends on the action of the audience.

The Fluxus art movement encouraged a “do it yourself” aesthetic. Like Dada before it, Fluxus included a strong current of anti-commercialism, disparaging the conventional market-driven art world in favor of an artist-centered creative practice. In terms of an artistic approach, Fluxus artists preferred to work with whatever materials were at hand, and either created their own work or collaborated in the creation process with their colleagues.

Event Scores, such as George Brecht’s “Drip Music”, are essentially performance art scripts that are usually only a few lines long and consist of descriptions of actions to be performed rather than dialogue. Fluxus artists differentiate event scores from happenings. Whereas happenings were sometimes complicated, lengthy performances meant to blur the lines between performer and audience, performance and reality, Fluxus performances were usually brief and simple. 

Among its early associates were Joseph Beuys, Dick Higgins, Nam June Paik, Wolf Vostell, La Monte Young, Joseph Byrd, and Yoko Ono who explored media ranging from performance art to poetry to experimental music to film. Throughout the 1960s and 1970s (their most active period) they staged “action” events, engaged in politics and public speaking, and produced sculptural works featuring unconventional materials.

Ultimately I want my work to reflect a happening or a similar style to Fluxus artists and aesthetics. 

Fluxus Movement and Happenings

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